Cherry Eye

Prolapsed Gland of the Nictitating Membrane (PGNM) or Cherry Eye is most commonly seen in English Bulldogs, Cocker Spaniels, and Beagles and occasionally in certain feline breeds such as Burmese, Himalayan, and Persians.

The third eyelid, or nictitating membrane, houses a tear producing gland which plays a significant role in lubricating the eye. Commonly referred to as “cherry eye,” a prolapsed gland of the nictitating membrane (PGNM) is essentially a herniation, or a protrusion of normal tissue into an abnormal place.  This displacement makes the gland easily visible and has the appearance of a red lesion or a cherry.  The problem typically occurs in younger dogs (under 2 years of age), and is most commonly seen in English Bulldogs, Cocker Spaniels, and Beagles.  Surgical intervention under general anesthesia is required to replace the gland to its normal position.  Prolonged exposure of the gland can result in irritation of the cornea and/or conjunctiva, decreased tear production, and can decrease the potential success with one surgery.

The price of this surgery depends on the severity of the condition and whether one or both eyes are involved. Find current costs of treatment.