Meibomian Gland Adenoma (MGA)

If MGA’s become large enough, they can cause irritation to the cornea and conjunctiva, and may reduce the normal ability to blink.

We see a variety of types of eyelid masses in practice. One of the most common is a Meibomian Gland Adenoma.  Proper diagnosis of eyelid masses typically requires an experienced veterinary ophthalmologist. Meibomian glands line the eyelid margins and contribute to lubricating the cornea, or surface of the eye, through the secretion of oils. Meibomian Gland Adenomas (MGA) are benign age related eyelid tumors which result from the accumulation of glandular material.  If they become large enough, MGAs can cause irritation to the cornea and conjunctiva, and may reduce the normal ability to blink. In most well behaved dogs, we can safely and effectively remove the masses using topical (eyedrops) and local (injectable) anesthetics only, leaving the patient fully awake and avoiding general anesthesia.  Following removal of the tumor, we also use freezing therapy in order to drastically reduce the potential incidence of tumor recurrence to a mere 15%.  Without cryotherapy, it is essentially expected that the tumor will recur to some degree in the future.

We also offer histopathologic evaluation (via a board certified pathologist at Colorado State University) at the owner’s request or at Dr. Dugan’s recommendation. See current treatment costs.

Before and after Meibomian Gland Adenoma treatment.

Before and after Meibomian Gland Adenoma treatment.